Cotton's Week: November 14, 2003

Cotton's Week: November 14, 2003

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®PhytoGen and the PhytoGen Logo are trademarks of PhytoGen Seed Company, LLC. ®™DOW Diamond, Enlist, Enlist Duo and the Enlist logo are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. The Enlist weed control system is owned and developed by Dow AgroSciences LLC. Enlist Duo® and Enlist One herbicides are not yet registered for use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are the only 2,4-D product authorized for use on Enlist crops. Always read and follow label directions. PhytoGen Seed Company is a joint venture between Mycogen Corporation, an affiliate of Dow AgroSciences LLC, and the J.G. Boswell Company.
USDA Raises ’03-04 Projection to 18.22 Million Bales

In its November crop report, USDA estimated a ’03-04 US crop of 18.22 million bales. Upland production was estimated at 17.77 million bales and ELS production at 442,000 bales. US mill use and exports are projected to reach 6.20 and 13.20 million bales, respectively, for total ’03-04 offtake of 19.40 million bales. Ending stocks are a projected 4.25 million bales for an ending stocks-to-use ratio of 21.9%.

USDA also gauged US ’02-03 cotton production at 17.21 million bales. Both projected mill use and exports were unchanged at 7.27 million bales and 11.90 million bales, respectively. The projected total offtake of 19.17 million bales generates an ending stocks value of 5.38 million bales. The estimated ending stocks-to-use ratio is 28.1%.

For the ’03-04 marketing year, USDA projected world production at 92.14 million bales, down 2.36 million bales from the October report. China accounts for the majority of this decline, with production estimated at 22 million bales, 3.5 million bales lower than last month’s estimate. World mill use was lowered 760,000 bales to 97.69 million. Consequently, world ending stocks for ’03-04 are projected to be 31.66 million bales for a stocks-to-use ratio of 32.4%.

U.S. Cotton Crop, ’03-04

 

 

 

Yield Per

5-Year

 

 

Planted

HARV.

Harv.

Avg.

480-Lb.

 

Acres

ACRES

Acre

Yield

Bales

 

Thou.

Thou.

Lb.

Lb.

Thou.

UPLAND

 

 

 

 

 

SOUTHEAST

3,141

2,969

753

603

4,658

AL

560

510

772

569

820

FL

100

97

636

502

128

GA

1,300

1,290

800

608

2,150

NC

840

770

686

636

1,100

SC

250

217

730

541

330

VA

91

85

734

708

130

MID-SOUTH

3,580

3,485

879

700

6,380

AR

 950

940

909

757

1,780

LA

550

520

895

638

970

MS

1,120

1,100

916

719

2,100

MO

400

390

825

677

670

TN

560

535

772

644

860

SOUTHWEST

5,915

4,680

467

488

4,550

KS

125

110

653

428

150

OK

190

170

565

518

200

TX

5,600

4,400

458

488

4,200

WEST

815

805

1,303

1,230

2,185

AZ

210

208

1,292

1,264

560

CA

550

555

1,341

1,266

1,550

NM

55

42

857

746

75

TOTAL UPLAND

13,451

11,939

715

638

17,773

TOTAL ELS

180

168

1,260

1,153

442

AZ

4

4

1,108

871

9

CA

150

139

1,312

1,208

380







’04 Beltwide to Focus on High Priority Issues, Innovative Farming Strategies

The ’04 Beltwide Cotton Production Conference will offer attendees insight into today’s cotton issues - from farm support mechanisms to trade negotiations - along with strategies central to profitable cotton farming.

The 2-day session is part of the ’04 Beltwide Cotton Conferences, Jan. 5-9 at the Marriott Rivercenter in San Antonio, TX. Held under a theme of “Today's Challenges - Tomorrow's Solutions,” the conferences also will include The Cotton Foundation Technical Exhibit and the 12 cotton technical conferences covering research progress in disciplines ranging from economics to weed science.

The 49th annual conference, set for Jan. 6-7, will include a first day focus on the major cotton issues. NCC Chairman Robert W. Greene will open the conference with a report on the NCC’s ’04 agenda to address those issues. John Maguire, NCC’s senior vice president-Washington Operations, will provide an update on Capitol Hill activities; J. Berrye Worsham, III, president and CEO of Cotton Incorporated, will cover research priorities for production agriculture and textiles; David Stanford, Plains Cotton Cooperative Assn., will talk about positioning US raw cotton in the global market; and Robert Antoshak, GLOBECOT Associates, will discuss how growers need to position themselves to produce cotton that is suitable for current as well as future fiber processing technologies.

Other reports that morning include NCC Vice Chairman Woody Anderson’s update on a ’03 NCC leadership visit to Brazil; a review of trade issues’ impact on the US cotton industry by NCC President/CEO Mark Lange; an in-depth look at farm program support mechanisms by NCC vice president, Economics and Policy Analysis, Gary Adams; and marketplace insights by Memphis merchant William B. Dunavant, Jr.

The second morning will open with a report by NCC Technical Services Director Andy Jordan on the threat that lint contamination poses. Also included will be an interdisciplinary researcher panel discussing crop rotation’s role in profitable cotton production; a consultant update on cotton varieties and transgenic cottons; insights on near-term and long-term weather from a USDA meteorologist; researcher updates on emerging variable rate pivot irrigation as well as drip irrigation; and a panel of 4 growers discussing innovative farming techniques.

Afternoon workshops will range from crop management systems derived from COTMAN to an in-depth look at farm program support mechanisms. Other seminars will cover precision agriculture, nematode management strategies, advanced options/hedging, farm management/Quicken and an expanded "New Developments from Industry" session.

For further information on conference registration and information, visit the Beltwide web site at http://www.cotton.org/beltwide/ or contact the NCC’s Debbie Richter, P.O. 820285, Memphis, TN 38182 (901) 274-9030 FX (901) 725-0510 or e-mail drichter@cotton.org.





APHIS Cost-Share Rule Released for Comment

In its November crop report, USDA estimated a ’03-04 US crop of 18.22 million bales. Upland production was estimated at 17.77 million bales and ELS production at 442,000 bales. US mill use and exports are projected to reach 6.20 and 13.20 million bales, respectively, for total ’03-04 offtake of 19.40 million bales. Ending stocks are a projected 4.25 million bales for an ending stocks-to-use ratio of 21.9%.

USDA also gauged US ’02-03 cotton production at 17.21 million bales. Both projected mill use and exports were unchanged at 7.27 million bales and 11.90 million bales, respectively. The projected total offtake of 19.17 million bales generates an ending stocks value of 5.38 million bales. The estimated ending stocks-to-use ratio is 28.1%.

For the ’03-04 marketing year, USDA projected world production at 92.14 million bales, down 2.36 million bales from the October report. China accounts for the majority of this decline, with production estimated at 22 million bales, 3.5 million bales lower than last month’s estimate. World mill use was lowered 760,000 bales to 97.69 million. Consequently, world ending stocks for ’03-04 are projected to be 31.66 million bales for a stocks-to-use ratio of 32.4%.

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U.S. Cotton Crop, ’03-04

 

 

 

Yield Per

5-Year

 

 

Planted

HARV.

Harv.

Avg.

480-Lb.

 

Acres

ACRES

Acre

Yield

Bales

 

Thou.

Thou.

Lb.

Lb.

Thou.

UPLAND

 

 

 

 

 

SOUTHEAST

3,141

2,969

753

603

4,658

AL

560

510

772

569

820

FL

100

97

636

502

128

GA

1,300

1,290

800

608

2,150

NC

840

770

686

636

1,100

SC

250

217

730

541

330

VA

91

85

734

708

130

MID-SOUTH

3,580

3,485

879

700

6,380

AR

 950

940

909

757

1,780

LA

550

520

895

638

970

MS

1,120

1,100

916

719

2,100

MO

400

390

825

677

670

TN

560

535

772

644

860

SOUTHWEST

5,915

4,680

467

488

4,550

KS

125

110

653

428

150

OK

190

170

565

518

200

TX

5,600

4,400

458

488

4,200

WEST

815

805

1,303

1,230

2,185

AZ

210

208

1,292

1,264

560

CA

550

555

1,341

1,266

1,550

NM

55

42

857

746

75

TOTAL UPLAND

13,451

11,939

715

638

17,773

TOTAL ELS

180

168

1,260

1,153

442

AZ

4

4

1,108

871

9

CA

150

139

1,312

1,208

380


US Agriculture Debating Case against EU Traceability, Labeling

In its November crop report, USDA estimated a ’03-04 US crop of 18.22 million bales. Upland production was estimated at 17.77 million bales and ELS production at 442,000 bales. US mill use and exports are projected to reach 6.20 and 13.20 million bales, respectively, for total ’03-04 offtake of 19.40 million bales. Ending stocks are a projected 4.25 million bales for an ending stocks-to-use ratio of 21.9%.

USDA also gauged US ’02-03 cotton production at 17.21 million bales. Both projected mill use and exports were unchanged at 7.27 million bales and 11.90 million bales, respectively. The projected total offtake of 19.17 million bales generates an ending stocks value of 5.38 million bales. The estimated ending stocks-to-use ratio is 28.1%.

For the ’03-04 marketing year, USDA projected world production at 92.14 million bales, down 2.36 million bales from the October report. China accounts for the majority of this decline, with production estimated at 22 million bales, 3.5 million bales lower than last month’s estimate. World mill use was lowered 760,000 bales to 97.69 million. Consequently, world ending stocks for ’03-04 are projected to be 31.66 million bales for a stocks-to-use ratio of 32.4%.

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U.S. Cotton Crop, ’03-04

 

 

 

Yield Per

5-Year

 

 

Planted

HARV.

Harv.

Avg.

480-Lb.

 

Acres

ACRES

Acre

Yield

Bales

 

Thou.

Thou.

Lb.

Lb.

Thou.

UPLAND

 

 

 

 

 

SOUTHEAST

3,141

2,969

753

603

4,658

AL

560

510

772

569

820

FL

100

97

636

502

128

GA

1,300

1,290

800

608

2,150

NC

840

770

686

636

1,100

SC

250

217

730

541

330

VA

91

85

734

708

130

MID-SOUTH

3,580

3,485

879

700

6,380

AR

 950

940

909

757

1,780

LA

550

520

895

638

970

MS

1,120

1,100

916

719

2,100

MO

400

390

825

677

670

TN

560

535

772

644

860

SOUTHWEST

5,915

4,680

467

488

4,550

KS

125

110

653

428

150

OK

190

170

565

518

200

TX

5,600

4,400

458

488

4,200

WEST

815

805

1,303

1,230

2,185

AZ

210

208

1,292

1,264

560

CA

550

555

1,341

1,266

1,550

NM

55

42

857

746

75

TOTAL UPLAND

13,451

11,939

715

638

17,773

TOTAL ELS

180

168

1,260

1,153

442

AZ

4

4

1,108

871

9

CA

150

139

1,312

1,208

380


Industry Fees Amendment Accepted by Senate Committee

The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee accepted an amendment offered by Sen. Craig (R-ID) to include a pesticide fees increase to the Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development Bill (S.1584). Offered on behalf of Agriculture Committee Chairman Cochran (R-MS), the action will temporarily increase pesticide maintenance and registration fees in order for the EPA to complete its ’06 pesticide re-registration project mandated under the ’96 Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA).

Under FQPA, the EPA was given broad authority to raise fees for not only maintaining old registrations and the registration of new products, but also to raise fees for the establishment of tolerances on food and feed, seen as the responsibility of the EPA and not industry by pesticide manufacturers. Additionally, there was no directive for the EPA to apply these funds to the registration of pesticides but instead went into the general treasury.

This bill prohibits the collection of tolerance fees and will raise about $200 million in additional maintenance and registration fees. Furthermore, the funds will be earmarked for the registration division of the EPA so they are not misused and placed into irrelevant programs. Finally, the bill obligates the EPA to make decisions on all new compounds within 24 months, with a provision to register “reduced risk” chemistries in 21 months. This timeline will supposedly save pesticide manufacturers millions of dollars in overhead costs by allowing them to market their products in a reasonable amount of time as opposed to waiting 5 years or longer to get a product registered.

The NCC encouraged Cotton Belt Senators to co-sponsor the bill for introduction into the Senate, with 8 co-sponsoring the bill with Chairman Cochran. The bill most likely will be incorporated in the omnibus package and included in the overall spending bill. The funding provided not only will bring accountability and timeliness to the EPA’s registration process, but also will allow the EPA to finish its FQPA responsibilities on time. The timely completion of the re-registration process is needed to prevent future lawsuits by the environmental community, which has used FQPA as a vehicle to attack pesticide use on many occasions.





Senate Committee Approves Highway Bill

The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee approved reauthorization of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21), providing $255 billion to address the nation's surface transportation needs over the next 6 years.

Most notably, the bill will affect many Cotton Belt states by increasing the rate of return for donor states that put more money into the highway trust fund than they receive back for state highway needs. The measure guarantees all donor states at least a 95% return.

Although the committee passed the bill, Senate floor action is not expected until next year. The Senate passed a short-term extension of the original bill until Feb. 29 earlier this year.





Export Sales for Week Ending Nov. 6

Net export sales passed the 7.2-million bale mark for ’03-04 with sales of 479,200 bales (480-lb.) for the week ending Nov. 6. Total sales at the same point in the ’02-03 marketing year were almost 5.6 million bales. Total new crop (’04-05) sales are 259,600 bales.

Shipments for the week were 208,300 bales, bringing total exports to date to 2.1 million bales, ahead of the 1.9 million bales at the comparable point in the ’02-03 marketing year.





Prices Effective November 14-20, 2003

In its November crop report, USDA estimated a ’03-04 US crop of 18.22 million bales. Upland production was estimated at 17.77 million bales and ELS production at 442,000 bales. US mill use and exports are projected to reach 6.20 and 13.20 million bales, respectively, for total ’03-04 offtake of 19.40 million bales. Ending stocks are a projected 4.25 million bales for an ending stocks-to-use ratio of 21.9%.

USDA also gauged US ’02-03 cotton production at 17.21 million bales. Both projected mill use and exports were unchanged at 7.27 million bales and 11.90 million bales, respectively. The projected total offtake of 19.17 million bales generates an ending stocks value of 5.38 million bales. The estimated ending stocks-to-use ratio is 28.1%.

For the ’03-04 marketing year, USDA projected world production at 92.14 million bales, down 2.36 million bales from the October report. China accounts for the majority of this decline, with production estimated at 22 million bales, 3.5 million bales lower than last month’s estimate. World mill use was lowered 760,000 bales to 97.69 million. Consequently, world ending stocks for ’03-04 are projected to be 31.66 million bales for a stocks-to-use ratio of 32.4%.

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U.S. Cotton Crop, ’03-04

 

 

 

Yield Per

5-Year

 

 

Planted

HARV.

Harv.

Avg.

480-Lb.

 

Acres

ACRES

Acre

Yield

Bales

 

Thou.

Thou.

Lb.

Lb.

Thou.

UPLAND

 

 

 

 

 

SOUTHEAST

3,141

2,969

753

603

4,658

AL

560

510

772

569

820

FL

100

97

636

502

128

GA

1,300

1,290

800

608

2,150

NC

840

770

686

636

1,100

SC

250

217

730

541

330

VA

91

85

734

708

130

MID-SOUTH

3,580

3,485

879

700

6,380

AR

 950

940

909

757

1,780

LA

550

520

895

638

970

MS

1,120

1,100

916

719

2,100

MO

400

390

825

677

670

TN

560

535

772

644

860

SOUTHWEST

5,915

4,680

467

488

4,550

KS

125

110

653

428

150

OK

190

170

565

518

200

TX

5,600

4,400

458

488

4,200

WEST

815

805

1,303

1,230

2,185

AZ

210

208

1,292

1,264

560

CA

550

555

1,341

1,266

1,550

NM

55

42

857

746

75

TOTAL UPLAND

13,451

11,939

715

638

17,773

TOTAL ELS

180

168

1,260

1,153

442

AZ

4

4

1,108

871

9

CA

150

139

1,312

1,208

380

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(202) 745-7805
(202) 483-4040 Fax

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