Short Temik® Supply Forces Prompt Action by Producers

An already short supply of Temik®, coupled with Bayer CropScience’s recent announcement terminating production of methyl isocyanate (MIC), the active ingredient in Temik® and Sevin®, caught many producers by surprise.

Published: March 23, 2011
Updated: May 24, 2011

An already short supply of Temik®, coupled with Bayer CropScience’s recent announcement terminating production of methyl isocyanate (MIC), the active ingredient in Temik® and Sevin®, caught many producers by surprise.

Producers planning to apply Temik® at planting for nematode management have few alternatives beyond pre-plant fumigant products and seed treatments. Logistics associated with the use of fumigant products such as Telone II®, Vapam®, or K-Pam™ may rule out their use for 2011 unless applications have already been planned well ahead of planting. Seed treatments for nematodes, such as AERIS™/Trilex™ Seed Treatments or Avicta® Complete Cotton, may be the grower’s best option as planting approaches. There are few management options for nematode during the season.  Management decisions must be made before planting. For more information, refer to First Forty Days and Fruiting to Finish Nematode Management.

Where nematodes are of little or no concern, but early season insect pressures are, insecticide seed treatment options may also be a consideration. Producers have greater flexibility in their insect management program. Various products are available for use as seed treatment, in-furrow, or foliar applications. Producers are cautioned concerning the sole use of foliar control programs for early-season pests such as thrips. The use of a seed treatment or in-furrow insecticide in conjunction with a foliar program is recommended for thrips management. For more information, refer to First Forty Days and Fruiting to Finish Insect Pest Management.

Producers may still have time to either order seed pre-treated or have existing seed stocks treated by their local dealer. Downstream application of seed treatments for nematodes (nematicide + insecticide + fungicide) or insects (insecticide + fungicide) is likely our best option. Most major Ag retailers or distributers have multiple locations that are certified treaters. The certified treaters know and understand seed treatment and product guidelines ensuring proper application resulting in performance equal to that of the seed supplier treated-seed. Product supply of seed treatment material appears to be good. Producers are encouraged to contact their local dealer as soon as possible to arrange for either treatment option, if desired.

In addition to the use of seed treatments, producers are recommended to utilize other practices to reduce the impact of nematodes and early-season insect pests.  Cultural practices that help the crop get off to a good start are important.  Knowledge of issues and variety selection to combat those issues is critical. Close attention to soil temperatures and the five day forecast will promote rapid germination and emergence. The importance of early season growth allowing the plant to develop a strong tap root and outpacing pests is often overlooked. Any advantage to the cotton plant over pests particularly during the early stages of growth when cotton is a poor competitor will help to preserve yield potential and profitability. Slightly delaying planting to ensure more optimum growing conditions and avoiding working wet fields or other practices which compact soil will improve early-season plant growth. For more information, refer to First Forty Days and Fruiting to Finish.

Producers with limited supplies of Temik® should prioritize its use to fields with high nematode numbers, areas where historically early heavy spider mite populations occur, or where heavy thrips pressure can be expected. Contact your local Cooperative Extension Service Agent or Specialist for recommendations for your specific situation. A seamless switch of nematode and insect management from Temik® to seed treatments or other management options can be accomplished but producers are advised to not delay.